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Current version by: Dan ,

Text:

Sadly your caught between a rock and a hard place :-{
 
Yes, your symptoms are inline with a GPU failure. In truth it’s the leadfree solder used to solder the chip which is the failure not the GPU chip it’s self in most cases.
 
What has happened is the constant heat has slowly altered the Tin from a conductive material into a semi-conductive crystal form. The correct way to fix this is to carefully remove the chip and clean off all of the old solder and apply fresh solder (some with Lead hopefully).
 
Reheating the GPU card can buy you a bit of time but it’s not a long term fix as all you’ve done is reflow some of the solder back into a conductive state. But as the solder still has crystals within it, in a short time the solder will once again recrystalize back.
 
If when you were a kid you made rock sugar by dangling a thread into a glass which had a high concentration of sugar water the sugar would build up crystals on the thread. If you remember it took a bit of time for it to start but once it did it, didn’t take much time to build up. That’s the same process here, just with Tin.
 
So the other option is replacing the GPU card with a new onceone if you can find it. Must today are from used systems and are costly!
So the other option is replacing the GPU card with a new onceone if you can find it. Must today are from used systems and are costly!
 
If you can find someone with the proper gear the clean off the old solder and re-ball the chip that would be the better solution.

Status:

open

Edit by: Dan ,

Text:

Sadly your caught between a rock and a hard place :-{
 
Yes, your symptoms are inline with a GPU failure. In truth it’s the leadfree solder used to solder the chip which is the failure not the GPU chip it’s self in most cases.
 
What has happened is the constant heat has slowly altered the Tin from a conductive material into a semi-conductive crystal form. The correct way to fix this is to carefully remove the chip and clean off all of the old solder and apply fresh solder (some with Lead hopefully).
What has happened is the constant heat has slowly altered the Tin from a conductive material into a semi-conductive crystal form. The correct way to fix this is to carefully remove the chip and clean off all of the old solder and apply fresh solder (some with Lead hopefully).
 
Reheating the GPU card can buy you a bit of time but it’s not a long term fix as all you’ve done is reflow some of the solder back into a conductive state. But as the solder still has crystals within it, in a short time the solder will once again recrystalize back.
Reheating the GPU card can buy you a bit of time but it’s not a long term fix as all you’ve done is reflow some of the solder back into a conductive state. But as the solder still has crystals within it, in a short time the solder will once again recrystalize back.
 
If when you were a kid you made rock sugar by dangling a thread into a glass which had a high concentration of sugar water the sugar would build up crystals on the thread. If you remember it took a bit of time for it to start but once it did it, didn’t take much time to build up. That’s the same process here, just with Tin.
 
So the other option is replacing the GPU card with a new once if you can find it. Must today are from used systems and are costly!
 
If you can find someone with the proper gear the clean off the old solder and re-ball the chip that would be the better solution.

Status:

open

Edit by: Dan ,

Text:

Sadly your caught between a rock and a hard place :-{
 
Yes, your symptoms are inline with a GPU failure. In truth it’s the leadfree solder used to solder the chip which is the failure not the GPU chip it’s self in most cases.
 
What has happened is the constant heat has slowly altered the Tin from a conductive material into a semi-conductive crystal form. The correct way to fix this is to carefully remove the chip and clean off all of the old solder and apply fresh solder (some with Lead hopefully). Reheating

Reheating
the GPU card can buy you a bit of time but it’s not a long term fix as all you’ve done is reflow some of the solder back into a conductive state. But as the solder still has crystals within in a short time the solder will once again recrystalize back.
What has happened is the constant heat has slowly altered the Tin from a conductive material into a semi-conductive crystal form. The correct way to fix this is to carefully remove the chip and clean off all of the old solder and apply fresh solder (some with Lead hopefully). Reheating

Reheating
the GPU card can buy you a bit of time but it’s not a long term fix as all you’ve done is reflow some of the solder back into a conductive state. But as the solder still has crystals within in a short time the solder will once again recrystalize back.
 
If when you were a kid you made rock sugar by dangling a thread into a glass which had a high concentration of sugar water the sugar would build up crystals on the thread. If you remember it took a bit of time for it to start but once it did it, didn’t take much time to build up. That’s the same process here, just with Tin.
 
So the other option is replacing the GPU card with a new once if you can find it. Must today are from used systems and are costly!
 
If you can find someone with the proper gear the clean off the old solder and re-ball the chip that would be the better solution.

Status:

open

Original post by: Dan ,

Text:

Sadly your caught between a rock and a hard place :-{

Yes, your symptoms are inline with a GPU failure. In truth it’s the leadfree solder used to solder the chip which is the failure not the GPU chip it’s self in most cases.

What has happened is the constant heat has slowly altered the Tin from a conductive material into a semi-conductive crystal form. The correct way to fix this is to carefully remove the chip and clean off all of the old solder and apply fresh solder (some with Lead hopefully). Reheating the GPU card can buy you a bit of time but it’s not a long term fix as all you’ve done is reflow some of the solder back into a conductive state. But as the solder still has crystals within in a short time the solder will once again recrystalize back.

If when you were a kid you made rock sugar by dangling a thread into a glass which had a high concentration of sugar water the sugar would build up crystals on the thread. If you remember it took a bit of time for it to start but once it did it, didn’t take much time to build up. That’s the same process here, just with Tin.

So the other option is replacing the GPU card with a new once if you can find it. Must today are from used systems and are costly!

If you can find someone with the proper gear the clean off the old solder and re-ball the chip that would be the better solution.

Status:

open